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Boat Stoves are a Must for Extended Voyages

May 12, 2010

Catamaran made of 12,500 reclaimed plastic bottles

On March 20, 2010, the 60-foot sailboat “Plastiki” built entirely of recycled materials, left San Francisco Bay on an 11,000-mile trip to Sydney, Australia to raise awareness of environmental issues.

At the end of April, the crew of six docked their vessel at Christmas Island – about 1,600 miles from Perth, Australia – after spending 38 consecutive days out at sea, the New York Times reports.

Cook Stoves, Accessories and Parts

Vessels that spend extended periods of time at sea are commonly equipped with a marine stove for preparing food during the trip. Jo Royle, captain of the Plastiki, told the news source that the 6 person crew uses just a two-burner propane stove to prepare all meals.

Propane is a clean and inexpensive fuel, and the tanks can easily be filled ashore. Other common fuels for boat stoves include diesel and alcohol. Diesel stoves manufactured by Dickinson Marine are sometimes also used as a heat source, since the fuel burns at a high temperature.

Propane Stoves

Most sailboat captains choose to use gimbal-mounted stoves, which are able to self level to match the heel of the boat. Ultimately boaters must first consider the size of their vessel and their access to a fuel/power source before selecting a boat stove.

After a stay of several days of both; restocking the ship and renewal of the crew at Christmas Island, the Plastiki planned to embark on a 20- to 30-day voyage to Fiji.

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