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Fire Boat Shows Off Marine Pump

June 18, 2010

Canadian Built Tampa Fireboat in Action

A multi-million dollar vessel owned by the Tampa Bay Fire Department in Florida boasted its cutting-edge pumping technology on Wednesday morning, when it put out a major fire at the Port of Tampa.

Early on June 16, several rubber conveyor belts at the port went up in flames, and the Patriot, the new fire boat, came to the rescue, myFox Tampa Bay reports. “With this vessel, the way that it’s built, its set up not only as a fire fight vessel but also as a command and control vessel,” Captain Bill Wade told the news source.

“[The firefighters] can control the situation from their side and make sure that fire crews are acting safely, because fighting a ship is much different than fighting a fire in a building.” Among its features, the Patriot can pump a total of 13,500 gallons of water per minute, which is the equivalent of nine fire trucks.

While recreational boaters don’t need the high magnitude of pumping power required by the fire department, marine pumps nonetheless prove useful to all boat owners. A modern 40’ vessel may have a dozen pumps or more, serving a myriad of functions aboard a modern yacht.

Bilge Pump

An electric bilge pump can remove water that accumulates in a bilge at a rate of about 60 gallons or more per minute. Fuel transfer pumps are typically vane pumps that offer reversible operation. Engine driven pumps can serve for engine cooling, or exhaust cooling. Freshwater pumps can supply water to all the fixtures aboard, transfer water, be used in a bait-well or deck wash-down situation. Finally, macerator pumps and be used to grind waste from a marine toilet, eventually pumping out the slurry mixture when the boat is docked.

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