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Jeff Adams Go2marine Operations Manager

“We’re on this little island in the Puget Sound, but we’re reaching boaters all around the world.” 

Jeff Adams, Go2marine Operations Manager

Google recently featured Go2marine in an Economic Impact Report showing how businesses use the web and eCommerce tools to grow business and a world wide customer base.

Go2marine has called a small island in Washington State’s Puget Sound home since 1999, but does business with customers around the world. Bainbridge Island was selected as a 2013 Google eCity Award recipient for Washington state as one of the strongest online business communities.

Read what Google had to say about Go2marine here!

 

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Old Boat, New Tricks

May 6, 2014

The Adventuress

The schooner Adventuress was designed by B.B. Crowninshield and built at the Rice Brothers Yard in East Boothbay, Maine. She launched in 1913; a two-masted, gaff-rigged schooner owned by John Borden II of Chicago. Borden commissioned the vessel for his personal use in the Arctic, where he planned to collect specimens including a bowhead whale skeleton for the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

 

John Bordon behind the wheel in 1913

Borden’s efforts to acquire a whale never reached fruition, Adventuress was later sold to the San Francisco Bar Pilots Association where she was used as a work boat for the next 35 years.

She transferred pilots to and from cargo vessels before being commissioned during WWII as a United States Coast Guard vessel assigned to guard San Francisco Bay.

AdventuressIn the 1950’s, the Adventuress was brought to Seattle and the Puget Sound. In the early 1960’s, Monty Morton acquired her, restoring much of her original lines which had been altered during her years as a working boat. Her topmasts, gaff rig and bowsprit returned and the main boom was lengthened to increase her sail area. She was then used for sail training by Youth Adventures, a non-profit organization closely tied with Scouting. In the late 1980’s, Sound Experience, another educational non-profit, began conducting educational programs aboard Adventuress continuing the ship’s youth mission. In recognition of her national significance, she was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1989.

She is currently owned and operated by Sound Experience, a Seattle area nonprofit organization who’s mission is to Educate, Inspire and Empower their community to make a difference for the future of our marine environment. Over 3,000 participants each year experience hands-on, experiential, on-the-water programs encouraging stewardship, teaching sustainability and promoting awareness of the ocean and estuarine environment.

In the past two decades alone, more than 60,000 have sailed aboard learning about the marine environment, and how their daily actions make a difference in its future. She is one of only two National Historic Landmark ships still sailing on the west coast, and one of the region’s most recognizable maritime icons.

Rig: Gaff Topsail Two-masted Schooner
Over all Length: 133 feet
Deck Length: 101 feet
Length at the Waterline: 71 feet
Beam: 21 feet
Draft: 12 feet
Rig Height: 110 feet
Sail Area: 5,478 sq. feet
Sail Number: TS15
Gross Tonnage: 98 tons
Auxiliary Engine: 250 hp diesel
Hull: Wood
Designer: B.B. Crowninshield
Commissioned: 1913
Builder: Rice Brothers East Boothbay, Maine

Adventuress Boater's BlogIn January of 2010, Sound Experience began a $1.2 million dollar Centennial Restoration Project leading up to Adventuress’ 100th birthday in 2013.

The project spanned a number of years and funded by grants and donations. January through April of 2010, Phase I of the restoration replaced forward port topside frames and planks (67 new futtocks and 840 feet of planking), fore chain plate, stem, fo’c’sle bunks, and anchor & headrig configuration.

Phase II & III took place November 2010 through March 2011, resulting in the re-framing of the starboard bow and the restoration of the Counter Stern. In January 2012 Phase IV began, focusing on the  propeller shaft. The following November through March of 2013, the below water-line port side was re-framed.

Mark

Schooner Adventuress “Splashes” with State of the Art Refrigeration

The 101 year old gaff-rigged historic schooner Adventuress re-launched April of 2014 in Port Townsend following the completion of a $1.2 million, five year Centennial Restoration Project.

Go2marine’s Mark McBride (a leading expert on marine refrigeration) worked alongside national designers, engineers and manufacturers to design an efficient, safe and ecologically sustainable refrigeration system for the 1913 schooner. Her galley now includes a fine touch of modern convenience, new Frigoboat Keel-Cooled AC/DC Refrigeration Systems supplied by Go2marine and Coastal Climate Control, North America.

Frigoboat Marine Refrigeration, renowned world-wide as one of the best possible solutions for on-board refrigeration needs, provides a little modern day cruising comfort to a remarkable, historic vessel.

At 133 ft in vessel length, one might think the Adventuress has plenty of space in the galley for this system. Fortunately the two Frigoboat systems nested easily in the only available nook of the galley where the systems supply refrigeration to two new hand crafted 15 cubic ft lockers, one of which houses a smaller freezer.

“Once I learned of their requirements, Frigoboat was really the best choice for the Adventuress” according to Mark, who added “Coastal Climate Control is a top notch company providing support and service to the marine markets for over 25 years and this was also an important factor in choosing Frigoboat systems.” Mark goes on to say that there must be literally thousands of Frigoboat systems in the world, and Frigoboat was chosen in Practical Sailor’s (June 2009) as the winner in the “Frig Chill-off” survey.

 

Frigoboat

Shop Frigoboat Equipment at Go2marine.com

“Green” Anodes

February 14, 2013

pencil anode

Navalloy Pencil Anode

We use sacrificial anodes on our boats to lessen the electro-chemical reaction between the submerged metal of our boats and the water in which it is used. The difference in electrical potential exists between any two different metals submerged in an electrolyte. For boats, this electrolyte is fresh, brackish, or salt water. This electrical potential is similar to that of a battery, in that there is an electrical current that passes through the water from one terminal to another, or in our case, one metallic material to a different metallic material

An anode is the negative “terminal” and the other metals are the cathodes, or positive “terminal.” The anode is sacrificial because the anode slowly corrodes and dissolves in water, preventing the cathode from corroding and dissolving. Since the sacrificial anodes eventually disappear, they have to be replaced at regular intervals.

Traditionally the sacrificial anode was made of high purity zinc, which does a good job of protecting most of the submerged metals of boats. However, zinc is highly toxic, even in very small quantities, and all of the boat zincs dissolving in our lakes, rivers, estuaries and oceans has a significant effect on the natural environment. Zinc is highly toxic to plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate fish. It is also known to be toxic when inhaled during welding or soldering of galvanized metals, causing “zinc shakes,” “zinc chills,” “galvie flu” or “metal dust fever.”

Other materials traditionally used for sacrificial anodes are magnesium and aluminum. Magnesium has been used for boats located in fresh water, but should not be used on aluminum boats in salt water, as it will cause excessive voltage differences that can cause hydrogen bubbles to form on the metal that can lift paint off of the aluminum hull. Magnesium has a higher degree of anodic protection than zinc, but this higher protection is too great to be useful on aluminum boats or out-drives in salt water. Aluminum anodes have a slightly higher degree of protection than zinc, but without the harmful over-protection of magnesium. However, pure aluminum anodes will quickly form an oxide layer that electrically insulates the aluminum, defeating the purpose of the anode. (Zinc also forms oxides in fresh water, which insulates it and prevents it from working.) Toward the end of the twentieth century, certain aluminum alloys were developed to make them superior to other sacrificial anodes. One of these alloys is made of 95% Aluminum, 5% Zinc, and .02% Indium, and is marketed by Performance Metals Products under the trade name of “Navalloy®.”

hull anode

Navalloy Hull Anode

Performance Metals Products manufacturers a complete line of sacrificial anodes for boats of all types, using their aluminum alloy Navalloy.  Navalloy has many properties that make it ideal for sacrificial anodes on our boats. This alloy has all the advantages of aluminum, without the disadvantages of pure aluminum or the toxicity of zinc. Navalloy is lighter than zinc and lasts 30 to 50% longer than zinc anodes. It has a higher protection voltage than zinc, but not dangerously high as with magnesium.

Performance Metals Products anodes have built-in wear indicators in them. The more traditional anodes, such as hull anodes, shaft anodes, and rudder and trim tab anodes have a red dot cast under the surface of the anode, when the dot is visible; it is time to change the anode. Their pencil anodes, used on the inside of heat exchangers and other engine parts, have the anode cast around a stainless steel core, which allows the anode to dissolve without the remainder breaking off and potentially causing water blockage problems as it moves around loose in the engine. These pencil anodes also work well in hot water, typically found within the cooling circuits of marine engines, heat exchangers and refrigeration condensers. Zinc anodes provide greatly reduced protection in hot water. Zinc anodes form a non-porous layer when the boat is hauled out of the water, which must be cleaned before the boat is launched. Navalloy does not form this layer, and work immediately upon re-immersion in water.

Environmental agencies have determined that zinc anodes are a major cause of pollution in marinas. Maryland is currently considering phasing out the use of zinc anodes in favor of aluminum alloys to solve this problem with zinc in marinas and boatyards.

Navalloy anodes are made to military specification MIL-DTL-24779B(SH).

Mercury and Johnson/Evinrude/OMC started selling aluminum alloy anodes in the early 1990’s. Other outboard and out-drive manufacturers also are switching to aluminum anodes. Some of the manufacturers may void the warranty coverage of their products if zinc anodes have been used.

Since Navalloy anodes provide better protection, are less toxic, last longer, work in all waters and weigh less, are there any reasons to keep using zinc anodes?

shaft anode

Navalloy Shaft Anode

Mark McBride – February 14, 2013

The number one reason that drive systems go out of alignment is that the engine mounts are worn or have sagged. The engine sits lower and lower and moves around more so there is increased wear and vibration on the entire drive of the vessel.

Marine engine mounts can make the difference between a low vibration engine, mounted stable in your boat or an iron monster that shakes the hull, produces noise and may lead to damage. Broken, damaged or worn engine mounts are not always obvious when 100’s of pounds of static motor are sitting on the mounts. Excess vibration can be caused by many things, including; mounts that are too soft or hard, worn engine mounts or how the mounts are attached to the bed. Of course, there are other things that can cause vibration, including; misalignment of transmission to shaft, worn components (cutlass bearing, transmission) or damaged components (propeller, shaft, transmission).

The forces of a high revving, high horsepower modern marine engine are passed directly onto the engine mounts. Even small one cylinder diesels really pound the engine mounts. For all their apparent simplicity, engine mounts are subject to a number of forces:

  • Longitudinal – The forward / aft motion of the engine
  • Lateral – The side to side motion of the engine
  • Vertical – the up and down motion of the engine

Most of these forces on a motor mount act in a form of chaotic unison. Not only must the engine hold its own position based on motor and transmission weight, but it also must resist the shearing force of the propeller under thrust. What looks like a simple job for an engine mount gets complex, quickly when throttling up; the engine mounts on one side are ‘stretched’, one the other side they are compressed, they are also subjected to shear by the thrust of the prop. Now add to the equation of a boat throttling up in rolling seas, or depending on the vessel, being subjected to storm conditions or high-speed pounding. The simple combination of metal and rubber that makes up an engine mount sees real abuse in a harsh environment.

Figuring out what engine mount you need:

  • Number of mounts. Most marine engine/transmission units use 4 engine mounts, some smaller/older units use 3
  • Matching up the weight and horsepower to an engine mount
  • Match the Make Model of your engine

Once you know how many mounts you need and a data about the engine/transmission then nearly every modern marine engine can be found with The Engine Mount Cross-Reference Guide. In summary, should you feel that your system has gotten out of alignment, check your engine mounts first. It is the sagging engine that puts pressure on the cutlass and shaft seal and wears them to the point of needing replacement.

There are four main manufacturers offering replacement throttle, shift and control cables for the boat owner. The choices between these are often small construction details.

Teleflex TFXTREME Control Cables

Teleflex – Teleflex bought up the original Morse division of control cables. Most boats over 20 years old will have Morse controls and cables. Teleflex has upgraded the original CC series cable to the new design CCX TFXTREME. Teleflex’s unique TFXTREME technology incorporates a patented splined core. Ridges on the core allow a close fit with the cable’s inner liner, but with minimum contact, so the core glides back and forth smoothly like a skater on ice.

The Teleflex TFXTREME control cable was designed because of the original ‘issues’ with traditional marine cables. Traditional cables vary by the stiffness of the core wire and how tightly it fits in the casing. More flexible core/looser fit has an easier feel, but allows more lost motion. This approach leads to an overall sloppy feel, RPM loss or difficult gear engagement. Stiffer core/tighter fit offers less lost motion, but is harder to move. With longer and more complex runs, cable movement becomes progressively more difficult. Thus the classic trade-offs that have existed in control cable design have been resolved with the Teleflex TFXTREME.

Uflex MACH Control Cables

Uflex – Uflex control cables are relatively new on the scene, offering some of the most popular OEM control cables in their own high performance design. To reduce the friction the MACH series control cable, Uflex use’s a multi layered core to shield design that allows for high efficiency and smooth operation. The maintenance free cables are wrapped in a long life, high resistance blue outer jacket to offer protection against abrasion, UV and chemicals.

Glendinning PRO-X Control Cables

Glendinning – Glendinning has also come on strong in the world of replacement control cables. Glendinning Pro-X cables offer a core which is very stiff while very having a great deal of flexibility is the heart of the Pro-X cable, providing minimal lost motion with high-efficiency. Glendinning builds a maintenance free control cable with a high density polyethylene liner around the central armored core. The entire multi-layer cable is in a corrosion resistant case with protective end seals for long life.

Felstead Marine Control Cables

Felstead – Felstead control cables are used in commercial vehicles, agriculture, construction and, of course, marine. Chances are, you handled something using a Felstead cable recently. They are reliable enough for parking brake systems that last the life of an automobile, truck and bus and are rugged enough for use in commercial vessels. Although not tailored for the smaller outboard industry, the 33C, 40 Series and 60 Series mirror the original Morse control cables and are found in vessels everywhere. Long life and smooth operation are assured with such features as rod bearing (the only in the industry) and a sealed, multi-layer cable design.

Ready to buy a throttle, shift, control cable? Check out the Go2marine’s guide to Making Sense of Marine Control Cables.

Lasdrop Dripless Shaft Seals

December 15, 2011

Lasdrop Gen II Dripless Shaft Seal, Premium Shaft Seal

Lasdrop dripless shaft seals are the answer for an easily installed replacement to the original stuffing box on nearly any boat. Once installed, there is virtually no maintenance required. The “Original” Bellows and Generation II models will last as long as eight to ten years before servicing, while the DrySeal model will last three to five years before the inner lip seal must be changed. At the service interval, both the Original and Generation II models would most likely require refurbishing of the seal surfaces. In addition, the bellows on the Original model should also be inspected and replaced, if necessary.

Green Solution – Lasdrop shaft seals are the green solution to preventing contaminated bilge water from entering the ocean you are in. Whether you are running a research vessel in Antarctica, a fishing boat in Norway, a world cruising sailboat or a workboat in Maine, keeping the water you run in clean is a good practice. Remember, keeping water out also means keeping engine and drive train bilge water in.

Lasdrop Shaft Seals are manufactured and engineered entirely in the USA. All Lasdrop products are backed by a three year warranty. Each model is easy to install, requires little or no maintenance, and is sold as a complete kit. Installation is easy and straight forward as long as you can access the area where the seal is installed. It will be necessary to disassemble the shaft from the coupling and the shaft will need to be slid back far enough to remove the original stuffing box.

Lasdrop incorporates injection ports for water lubrication in vessel applications where speeds are over 10 knots. Lasdrop builds single injection port shaft seals from 3/4″ to 1-1/8″ and offers 2 (dual) injection ports installed for shaft sizes from 1-1/8″. Built for any budget and boat, Lasdrop supplies 3 different levels of dripless shaft seals.

Good – the Lasdrop DrySeal is a compact, economical lip seal designed for quick and easy installation. This option offers a lip seal that is in constant low friction contact with the propeller shaft, preventing water from entering your vessel. The simple, affordable solution to a leaking tired stuffing box.

Better – the Lasdrop Original “Bellows” seal is a face seal that features a vibration absorbing bellows, ideal for use on sailboats and workboats. Specially balanced for smooth rotation, this model utilizes a 316 stainless steel and carbon graphite for its sealing surfaces. These modifications and materials result in a dripless shaft seal that lasts twice as long as the Lasdrop DrySeal.

Best – the Lasdrop Gen II is a culmination of more than a quarter century of experience in shaft seal design. An exclusive feature that makes it the premier shaft seal are a unique ball-bearing drive system that allows the seal ring to “float” and remain in constant contact with the carbon graphite seal surface, resulting in a seal that’s impenetrable to water.

Rocking the Boat - Spring 2010

15 years ago the Rocking the Boat volunteer project began as a way to offer teens in South Bronx hope for a better future through creating – then using a boat they built with their own hands. “I get to say [I’m] still in my first job out of college, which is kind of fun,” jokes the founder Adam Green, now 37.

There is weeklong concentration and training period of just using the tools to build the boats before any construction begins, as reported to Stephanie Lin for NBCNewyork.com. It takes 16 students 13 weeks to complete a single boat, from the raw wood and parts to a finished hull ready for the water.

Since August 1998 over 400 students from more than 40 different high schools have been involved in building 22 traditional wooden boats. The program highlights diversity form one of the nations poorest inner city areas. Boys and girls participate in equal numbers, and represent Latino, African-American, West Indian, Indian, Asian, South American, and African cultures. They are drawn mostly from the Bronx but also Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens.

In March, Rocking the Boat officially opened its new 6,000 square foot building in Hunts Point. There is a continued interest in boatbuilding and the opportunity it brings for personal growth and accomplishment.

Although Go2marine did not supply parts to the Rocking the Boat organization, we support special interest groups similar to Rocking the Boat. Go2marine supplies 1000’s of boatbuilders and owners each year with parts and support for projects ranging from non-profit groups to father/son activities to vessel repower and rebuild ventures. With over 170,000 boat parts, ranging from both powerboat and sailboat parts to complete engines and drive systems, there is something for nearly any boater.

Rocking the Boat, boat building project in the Bronx is unique and offers hope and skills that end up on the water and in peoples lives; this is certainly a case of when the boat is more than just a sum of the parts that make it up.