Home

From boating on the lake to tying up at the dock...

Go2marine with Taylor Made Marine Products is offering a drawing of $500 Gift Card for one lucky boater. Enter the Taylor Made Sweepstakes.

Taylor Made manufacturers a complete source of marine products and accessories. From the dock edging and guards right next to your boat to the fenders, buoys and mooring whips that keep your boat from contacting the dock. Taylor Made offers bimini tops, anchor shade umbrellas, misting systems and other products to protect you from the sun while on your boat as well as boat covers to keep your boats finish looking like new.

Tenara Thread - Lifetime Seam Warranty

Tenara thread is now used in all Ultima and Hotshot fabric products including boat covers, biminis and motor hoods. Tenara thread is guaranteed to outlast ANY fabric that it is used to sew – this means no more seams separating because the thread has failed to live up to the sun or weather.

Sweepstakes ends June 15th, 2011. No purchase necessary. See details below**

**You must be 18 years or older to enter. No purchase necessary. $500 Gift Card will be issued from a major credit card company. See full sweepstakes rules and details here.

Servicing for Glacier Bay Refrigeration

To sailboat and powerboat cruisers locally and around the world, the name Glacier Bay was recognized for many years as one of the leaders in marine refrigeration. Although Glacier Bay is no longer building or servicing the marine refrigerators / freezers, service is now available through Pacific Sea Breeze Marine.

For all of you lucky boaters who have been enjoying the many benefits of a Glacier Bay refrigeration system, you will be happy to learn that Pacific Sea Breeze Marine has taken over the support and service for these wonderful refer systems.  Located in Santa Cruz California, Pacific Sea Breeze Marine supplies a wide range of marine products for heating, cooling, and refrigeration.  They will soon be offering their own line of refer systems comparable to Glacier Bay’s high-capacity Micro HPS as well as smaller systems to meet the full range of marine refrigeration applications. They can be reached at info@pacificseabreeze.com.

As many will recall, a few years ago Glacier Bay decided to shift emphasis away from marine and concentrate on other endeavors such as Glacier Bay Technology Climate Control System for trucks.  This allows the drivers to be comfortable in their sleeper cab without having to leave their motors idling.  According to Glacier Bay Technology, fleets can save as much as $4,800 per truck per year in fuel costs.

Interesting opportunity for the truckers, but for many of us we wish they were still building their marine refrigeration units.  Thankfully Pacific Sea Breeze Marine has arrived on the scene for support and service!

Boat Parts – New for 2011

January 27, 2011

The boating industry, although changed by the new economy, continues to initiate improved and innovative products and boat parts for 2011.

Lasdrop Dual Injection Port Dripless Shaft Seal

Lasdrop Dripless Shaft Seal

Lasdrop has added duel injection ports for their entire product line of shaft seals over 1-1/8″. Dual injection ports can also be fitted to smaller shafts. The primary reason for this change? To accommodate dual engines for a situation when one engine is shutdown, but the other is still being used to ‘get home’. Water will still be able to cycle through the seal of the still turning shaft to keep it cool from either engine to either shaft seal. For those boats with just one shaft, don’t worry, the Lasdrop kit also comes complete with a block off plug. This easy to ignore boat part now lasts longer and is made more reliable.  Additionally, all installation hardware is now included.

QNP Light Commercial Safe-T-Puller

QPNW Crab and Shrimp Pot Pullers

These pot pullers are designed for serious recreational and commercial use with four improved electric models. The Light Commercial pot hauler is built to pull in 300 pound pots all day and features new cooling fins on the 2.1 HP motor to insure long life. All of the Safe-T-Puller pot haulers now include a factory installed roller-fairlead and quick-detach kit. The Safe-T-Hauler includes roller-fairlead, swivel block and 3-piece davit w/SS quick-release pins. Quality Products Northwest continues to build pot pullers as it has for more than a decade and a half; making improvements to offer long service life for the fishing industry.

Glendinning Pro-X Control Cables

Glendinning Control Cables

Although not entirely new on the scene with marine products and boat parts, Glendinning introduced the Pro-X Control Cables just a couple of years back. The Pro-X control cables are designed for high performance operation with a minimum loss of motion and almost no resistant forces. What this means for the recreational and commercial user is simply a long-lasting low friction, high performance control cable to replace original Morse or Teleflex fitted cables. Control cables are available in the popular 33C configuration as well as Mercury, OMC, Gen I, Gen II, BRP, Johnson, Evinrude Style, 43 C/BC, 64 C/BC and more.

Before we get into the 2010 winners, Go2marine would like to thank all who entered!

We had stacks of entries which you can view the popular ones on our Go2marine Facebook Page, in the Photos tab, along with past years winners. It was hard to choose and the pictures were selected by the staff here who, when combined, represents diverse boating backgrounds.

The 'founders' of the Hotdog Photo Category

The new addition for the 2011 Contest year will be “The Hotdog Category” which will be open to photos of pets and boating. This is the photo that tipped the scale for the new category. Yes, that is a real photo, taken after a day of tough boating with the family.

Send us in your pet boating pictures to boatersline@go2marine.com with the subject “2011 Hotdog Photo”.

The first place entries won a $100 gift certificate in each of the three categories. Additionally, we ended up choosing 4 Runner ups who won a $50 gift certificate each. Go2marine does appreciate all who entered and has chosen to send any of the other entries a $10 coupon.

1. Best Action Photo – $100 Winner.  Hannah Redmond leaps from her 1968 Trojan Bimini, Chesapeake Bay, MD; taken by Michael Redmond. My restored ’68 Trojan Bimini “MoNaH” is the perfect boat in the upper Chesapeake for both family outings and fishing alone. My daughters have spent the past decade enjoying the beauty and bounty of the bay and we couldnt imagine a more perfect boat to do it on!

First Place - Action

2. Best Classic / Yacht Photo – $100 Winner. This was taken at low tide in Skerries, Ireland.

First Place Classic / Yacht

3. Best Family / Cruising Photo – $100 Winner. We were dog sitting the Boxer (Shelby) for the weekend. The other 3, Barbie, Sponge Bob and Baker are ours and we named our boat, “The Three B’s” after them. They come everywhere with us and LOVE to go on the boat even more than car rides! They all have their sea legs and lifejackets, know their way around the boat and like to swim at Potters Cove.

First Place Family / Cruising

4. Runner Up Action Photo – $50 Winner. Ever ride a Spinnaker Swing? Putting a chute to good use, 12 year old Jay loosing his mind or why my kids like to sail. Thousand Islands, St Lawrence…

Runner Up - Action

5. Runner Up Action Photo – $50 Winner. This was a picture was taken during 30+ knots during a Wednesday Night 
Summer Racing series in Narragansett Bay from Wickford this summer.  The Jamestown Bridge and Plum Point lighthouse is in the background.  This boat had just lost their spinnaker.

Runner Up - Action

6. Runner Up Classic / Yacht Photo – $50 Winner. The Sea Dog is a Pacific Northwest classic yacht cruising the San Juan Islands. This photo was taken off the deck of our Classic converted 88’ converted Tug Boat called the Tyee. This photo of the Sea Dog is in Deer Harbor (Orcas Island) 2010.

Runner Up - Classic

7. Runner Up Family / Cruising Photo – $50 Winner. Myself and the Admiral tucked into a sheltered spot on a damp day, on the Bras D’Or Lakes, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.

Runner Up - Family / Cruising

Thank you to all who entered and we will see you again next year! You may send photos to:  boatersline@go2marine.com with the subject “2011 Boating Photos”.



It is another new year and most of us have tucked away our boats for the long winter of hibernation here in the North. This boat hibernation is not localized to just the northern part of the US, Boaters from San Fransisco Bay (and the Chesapeake on the Easy Coast) north usually park their vessels until the first days of spring.

So here are some New Years resolutions.

1. Prep the boat and do that one job that you have been putting off. There will be time right before you launch for paint, varnish and epoxy (and the weather will be warmer) in the spring. Now is the time to install those LED navigation lights, rewire the power distribution panel, change the steering helm and cables or fit a new toilet to your slumbering vessel. Pick just one job and follow it through so that you will be ready to play this next season.

2. Take a Boater’s Safety Course. Many States are requiring boaters to have completed a boaters safety course; currently, only 9 do not. Locally, the state course is often a one time class that you might not have to take for years, yet you could just ‘get it out of the way’. Some insurance companies offer a break for taking a course. The US Power Squadron (USPS) has come up with a boating safety course suitable for any students situation. There are several ways that you can take a USPS course, in class, online or through an interactive CD-ROM. Lastly, get those who boat with you aboard your vessel to complete a course – better yet, take it together.

3. Plan your next journey. Look up the information and make plans for your next boating adventure. One of the easiest ways to plan the route is using the C-Map system in your chartplotter. Whether you  are taking a trawler down the Intercoastal Waterway, a sailboat adventure to Alaska or just planning to visit those local lakes that you always wanted to fish. Internet research is easier than ever with private blogs about people doing similar things, YouTube videos or professional tour sites. Plan for those dreams and make them possible.

4. Join a professional organization that helps on the water. Volunteers are needed by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary (USCGA), Fish and Wildlife, Environmental study groups and others. There is no way better to connect with people and the marine enviroment as there is when you give your time. Whether it is helping repair a local boat ramp, counting spawning fish or inspecting vessels as a member of the USCGA, it is hard to find a more rewarding effort in a place that you care about.

5. Speaking of vessel inspection; get a vessel safety check by the USPS or the USCGA. Be a proactive boater and arrange to get this simple inspection that confirms that you have right equipment aboard (which you should have). The inspection is voluntary and is not boarding or a law enforcement issue. No citations will be given as a result of this encounter. You will be supply with a copy of the evaluation so that you may follow some of the suggestions given. Vessels that pass will get a VSC decal.

6. Get others involved in boating. Take a friend and expose them to boating. Send someone you care about a marine magazine. Share the enjoyment that you get from boating and take someone else down to the docks. Nothing fosters support better than those you care about getting involved with something you care about. Boating is about how the activity makes you feel as mush as it is about doing the activity.

7. Get a new or used boat. Now is a great time to purchase a boat – and what better activity that readying yourself for ownership in a boat if you have not had one. It is also a great time to upgrade to a larger vessel. A co-worker here bought a smaller sailboat so that their children might learn to sail a boat by themselves. Get one of those new smaller kayaks so that you can explore the shore while anchored in the perfect place. Whether big or small, increasing your boat stable may just help you spend more time doing what you truly care about.

Me? I have an electrical panel to install and have been putting off helping a friend who is a volunteer with a shoreline group… My resolutions for this year.

In 2010, the Frasier River watershed in Canada had its biggest sockeye salmon run in 97 years.  This mammoth run was in direct contrast to the 2009 run which was disastrously low at the end of a 20 year decline. The 2009 run was so significantly poor that the Canadian government formed a commission to investigate possible causes.

Just prior to the Canadian commission beginning the investigation of  the paltry 2009 run, commercial fishermen “started hauling in more Fraser River sockeye than any of them had ever seen.” reported by Daniel Jack Chasan of Crosscut.com.

There appears to be two significant factors that contributed to the boom run of 2010. First, in 2008 when the sockeyes were juveniles there were favorable water conditions. Second was the ash fall from the eruption of Alaska’s Kasatochi volcano in 2008. Volcanic eruptions result in an increase in iron in the water which in turn resulted in huge algae blooms that dramatically improved the fish’s food supply. A similar significant salmon run was reported in 1958 after Alaska’s Veniaminof eruption in 1956.

Beyond the natural environmental factors, other factors may be credited to man, including; improved logging practices, resurgence in organic (terra) farming, new protections for upstream habitat, restoration of habitat and restrained commercial fishing catch limits has begun to make a difference in salmon survival. Environmentalists are now optimistic that the huge 2010 sockeye run is a sign of better times ahead.

Salmon runs typically peak every 4 years. With this historical run there has been a turn in interest, both commercially and recreationally in salmon fishing in the Pacific Northwest. With the challenges that the boat building and fishing industries have faced in the past several years, this good news is well received; abeit with cautious optimism.

Grunden's Fishing and Rain Gear

 This years extraordinary salmon return has salmon fisheries on the West Coast of the United States ramping back up for a cautious return to commercial and recreational fishing.  According to Go2marine, they have seen upswing in demand for Grundens foul weather gear and Dutch Harbor gear. Refurbishing and upgrading fishing boats requires renewed hydraulic equipment, boat parts and marine supplies.  Go2marine and Go2hydraulics supports ecofriendly, sustainable fishing.



The winter holiday season is upon us. Many of you have put the boat away under cover or secured her at the dock for the long winter nap. This is the time to buy the ‘toy’ for the next seasons use!

Go2marine is your boats best friend! Not to be left out, we also carry products for your home – treasures for when you are away from the dock and longing for the water. Check out these great deals!

Handcrafted Model Ships & Boats

Free Shipping on Model Ships; set sail with the historic Bluenose or prepare yourself for the 100th anniversary of the Titanic sinking with your own accurate ship model. From “Old Ironsides” to modern America’s Cup challengers and defenders, there is something for nearly every home or office.

Free Shipping on Select Weems and Plath; keep track of time, barometric pressure, temperature or tide with a quality built Weems and Plath Instrument. Manufactured of beautifully polished, solid cast brass, chrome or other fine metals with wood; there is a clock, barometer – or even a barograph – for a bulkhead, wall, mantle or desk in your life.

Ecofan 802 Airplus

On Sale, the Ecofan. Know someone with a wood or propane stove? The Ecofan is a great gift; it helps move air around and requires no electricity! The Ecofan makes its own electricity to run the fan from the heat of the stove. Simply set the fan on the stove and enjoy the principle of thermoelectric firsthand.

When you get back to your boat, you will really appreciate any of these items!

The Gill Clothing double deal! Free Shipping on select Gill clothing and if you order over $175 of Gill clothing you will also receive a free Gill Multitool. Prepare for the worst – dress with the best! Gill clothing had been in every ocean on the planet, subjected to some truly challenging environments and is regarded the as the sailors* favorite clothing. – *you can see them being worn on land as well!

AccuSat 406 EPIRB

Stay found with a new EPIRB. The AccuSat 406 EPIRB, Class 2 with a Non-Hazmat Battery can be shipped nearly anywhere and coded for your vessel and country or origin. 406 EPIRB’s are what the USCG recommends for all offshore mariners to use.  The GME Accusat 406 can make the difference between being found or drifting for 12 days.

Someone just too tough too buy for? The perfect gift is a Go2marine Gift Certificate.

“Really?” – You don’t even need to come out on deck to order! We have shipped to over 165 countries. Order on-line and have your item shipped to you before Christmas.

Visit our Holiday Gift Ideas section for more gift choices.

Merry Christmas from the Staff of Go2marine.

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary

 

Hello Boaters, 

It is Fall and for many of us we really appreciate the off-season boating. This season typically means that boaters encounter fewer boats and that the water and weather is subject to frequent changing conditions. Kirk Scarborough of the Coast Guard Auxiliary reminds boaters, “don’t be a boating casualty on the water. Follow these simple rules to have a safe and enjoyable day.” 

  • Check the weather before heading out on the water
  • Monitor the weather continuously with a Marine Radio
  • It is recommended that every one wear an approved PFD, but at a minimum, PFD’s should be readily available.
  • Know about the boat you are on; especially true for those renting or borrowing a boat.
  • More than one person (the skipper) should know the location of all Safety Gear, including the VHF Radio.
  • Do not rely on cell phones as a primary means of communication. Contacting someone on a cell phone precludes aid from a local Good Samaritan.
  • The best way to get help is through a Marine Radio.
  • File a Float Plan with someone who knows where you are going and when you are expected to return. USCG Auxiliary Float Plan in a printable PDF form that you can save to your computer.
  • Receive a free Vessel Safety Check from the USCG Auxiliary.
  • Take a safe boating class in the state you are in.

Marine Communication - VHF & SSB Radios & Satellite Phones

 

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is a uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America’s Volunteer Guardians, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.

Family Boating Fun

It is half way through the 2010 summer boating season and Go2marine wants you to stay safe. Here are some reminders of safe water and boating rules. The first rule of boating is to stay aboard and not have an accident. The second rule is PFDs are the key to survival when in the water.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the USCG offer these tips for safe boating and play in the water.

  1. Don’t Swim Alone: Do not allow children to swim without an adult. Even adults should never swim alone. It is best to swim with others. In a pool, swim at a depth that is safe for you. If you’re just learning to swim, stay in the shallow end. Keep in mind that swimming at night increases all risks.
  2. Follow Regulations: If you are at a public pool or beach, follow all regulations and lifeguard directions. Depth markers are important. You should never dive into shallow water. Additionally, if there is not a lifeguard on duty, you should take extra safety precautions.
  3. Learn to Swim and Boat: If you have a pool, or your family takes part in water activities, it is very important that you know how to swim. Learning basic swimming and boating techniques can save lives. Check with your local YMCA or community pool for information on swimming lessons from a certified swimming instructor. Most States and the USCG Auxiliary offer safe boating courses.
  4. Safety Equipment: It is important to keep rescue equipment by the pool or on your boat. PFDs – Life preservers and life jackets should be easy to access in case of an emergency. Additionally, adults and teens should know CPR. Statistics show that when CPR is performed, it improves the outcome for drowning victims.
  5. PFDs – Flotation Vests: When boating, you should wear a US Coast Guard-approved flotation vest, regardless of your swimming abilities. Even while wading in the ocean, at the lake or in a river, it is recommended to wear a personal flotation device; and is especially important for inexperienced swimmers and children. Remember, water wings, noodles, inner tubes and rafts should never take the place of an approved PFD.
  6. Designated Areas: Swim only at designated beaches or in swimming areas marked with buoys that keep boaters, water skiers and jet skiers away. If you cross these buoys, you run the risk of not being seen by boaters, and you could potentially be injured. Additionally, rip currents, tides and water depths may be deterrent the farther out you swim. Remember, designated swimming areas are the safest place to swim. 
  7. Don’t Drink* and Swim: At times, your swimming activities may also include a family BBQ or picnic. However, it is important to remember that alcohol and water sports don’t mix. Your chances of drowning or becoming injured increase greatly when under the influence of alcohol. Additionally, many beaches do not allow alcoholic beverages.
  8. Surf Conditions: Ask a lifeguard about surf conditions before swimming in the ocean. Rip tides are dangerous and can catch even the best swimmers off guard. If you are caught in a rip current, swim parallel to the shore. Once you are free of the current, swim toward the shore. Rip currents can be recognized as water that is discolored, choppy, foamy or filled with debris and moving in a channel away from the shore. Report any hazardous conditions to the lifeguard on duty.
  9. Warning Flags: Beaches post warning flags to alert swimmers of the day’s conditions. Be sure to check these flags before entering the water.

The USCG has enforced a nation wide crackdown on bow riding. One of the most likely ways to get killed or maimed on a boat is to ride on the front, or bow, U.S. Coast Guard officials warned while announcing a crackdown on the practice. Even having on a life vest may not help the person who falls overboard, officials said, since the boat’s hull and the propeller can pose serious and immediate threats of injury.

Speaking to the Washington Post, USCG Petty Officer 2nd Class Nathan Henise said compared the practice of riding on the front of a boat to riding on a car’s hood. “Would you put your child on the hood of your car and ride around?” he asked rhetorically.

The top five contributing factors to the accidents included boat operator inattention and inexperience, excessive speed, improper lookout and alcohol consumption. The report states that *alcohol consumption “continues to be of major concern” in fatal accidents, and was the leading factor in 16 percent of deaths.

In addition, a full 86 percent of boat operators involved in fatal accidents had not received boat safety instruction.

Bay Sailing

Some sobering statistics to ponder, did you know that:

  • Swimming is the third most popular recreational activity in the US.
  • Children from non-swimming households are eight times more likely to be at-risk of drowning.
  • According to the United States Lifesaving Association, rip currents cause approximately 100 deaths annually in the United States.
  • According to the USCG, drowning is the second leading cause of accidental death among children younger than the age of 15.
  • The CDC also estimates an average of 10 people — adults or children — drown every day in this country.
  • 92% of children who survive a drowning are discovered within two minutes following submersion, and 86% children who die are found after 10 minutes.
  • A total of 4,730 accidents recorded by the Coast Guard in 2009 caused 736 deaths, over 3,300 injuries and about $36 million in property damage.

Enjoy yourself, take your time and wear a PFD while boating. Play safe, know how to swim and have a buddy when in the water. Complete a safe boating course whether you are a new or long time boater.

In parting, here is something you can do to prevent the other common ‘fall overboard’ situation.

Free Shipping on Inflatable PFDs*

Our most popular inflatable PFDs are now shipped to you FREE*.

Inflatable Life Vests, Jackets (PFDs)

Inflatable PFDs come with a number of features that help tailor the vests design to the end-user. The primary choices to be made are between the manual or automatic / manual inflation system. Automatic / Manual inflation systems work when the PFD is submerged in water (not spray) and they also use the manual pull cord as a backup to inflate the PFD in situations where you want it already inflated before getting into the water. A Manual only system is useful for water sports like kayaking or canoeing where you might get wet, but do not want the PFD to fill on its own. The downside to a manual only system is that it will not inflate unless you pull the cord. All inflatables come with some sort of oral inflation tube that will supplement the manual or automatic / manual system.

Inflatable PFDs are also available with or without a harness system. If you are in an enviroment where you might be washed off a boat, as in cruising offshore, you will want a harness so that you may secure yourself to the boat.

One size fits all – well almost. You will need to be 16 and a minimum of 80 pounds to wear an inflatable PFD. The Coast Guard also takes the position that non-swimmers should not wear this type of PFD.

Guide to Inflatable Lifejackets and Vests – PFDs.

* May not be combined with any other codes or promotions. Inflatable PFDs are shipped ground to the lower 48 States. Applies to most of our popular inflatable PFDs, but not all.