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Jeff Adams Go2marine Operations Manager

“We’re on this little island in the Puget Sound, but we’re reaching boaters all around the world.” 

Jeff Adams, Go2marine Operations Manager

Google recently featured Go2marine in an Economic Impact Report showing how businesses use the web and eCommerce tools to grow business and a world wide customer base.

Go2marine has called a small island in Washington State’s Puget Sound home since 1999, but does business with customers around the world. Bainbridge Island was selected as a 2013 Google eCity Award recipient for Washington state as one of the strongest online business communities.

Read what Google had to say about Go2marine here!

 

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Old Boat, New Tricks

May 6, 2014

The Adventuress

The schooner Adventuress was designed by B.B. Crowninshield and built at the Rice Brothers Yard in East Boothbay, Maine. She launched in 1913; a two-masted, gaff-rigged schooner owned by John Borden II of Chicago. Borden commissioned the vessel for his personal use in the Arctic, where he planned to collect specimens including a bowhead whale skeleton for the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

 

John Bordon behind the wheel in 1913

Borden’s efforts to acquire a whale never reached fruition, Adventuress was later sold to the San Francisco Bar Pilots Association where she was used as a work boat for the next 35 years.

She transferred pilots to and from cargo vessels before being commissioned during WWII as a United States Coast Guard vessel assigned to guard San Francisco Bay.

AdventuressIn the 1950’s, the Adventuress was brought to Seattle and the Puget Sound. In the early 1960’s, Monty Morton acquired her, restoring much of her original lines which had been altered during her years as a working boat. Her topmasts, gaff rig and bowsprit returned and the main boom was lengthened to increase her sail area. She was then used for sail training by Youth Adventures, a non-profit organization closely tied with Scouting. In the late 1980’s, Sound Experience, another educational non-profit, began conducting educational programs aboard Adventuress continuing the ship’s youth mission. In recognition of her national significance, she was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1989.

She is currently owned and operated by Sound Experience, a Seattle area nonprofit organization who’s mission is to Educate, Inspire and Empower their community to make a difference for the future of our marine environment. Over 3,000 participants each year experience hands-on, experiential, on-the-water programs encouraging stewardship, teaching sustainability and promoting awareness of the ocean and estuarine environment.

In the past two decades alone, more than 60,000 have sailed aboard learning about the marine environment, and how their daily actions make a difference in its future. She is one of only two National Historic Landmark ships still sailing on the west coast, and one of the region’s most recognizable maritime icons.

Rig: Gaff Topsail Two-masted Schooner
Over all Length: 133 feet
Deck Length: 101 feet
Length at the Waterline: 71 feet
Beam: 21 feet
Draft: 12 feet
Rig Height: 110 feet
Sail Area: 5,478 sq. feet
Sail Number: TS15
Gross Tonnage: 98 tons
Auxiliary Engine: 250 hp diesel
Hull: Wood
Designer: B.B. Crowninshield
Commissioned: 1913
Builder: Rice Brothers East Boothbay, Maine

Adventuress Boater's BlogIn January of 2010, Sound Experience began a $1.2 million dollar Centennial Restoration Project leading up to Adventuress’ 100th birthday in 2013.

The project spanned a number of years and funded by grants and donations. January through April of 2010, Phase I of the restoration replaced forward port topside frames and planks (67 new futtocks and 840 feet of planking), fore chain plate, stem, fo’c’sle bunks, and anchor & headrig configuration.

Phase II & III took place November 2010 through March 2011, resulting in the re-framing of the starboard bow and the restoration of the Counter Stern. In January 2012 Phase IV began, focusing on the  propeller shaft. The following November through March of 2013, the below water-line port side was re-framed.

Mark

Schooner Adventuress “Splashes” with State of the Art Refrigeration

The 101 year old gaff-rigged historic schooner Adventuress re-launched April of 2014 in Port Townsend following the completion of a $1.2 million, five year Centennial Restoration Project.

Go2marine’s Mark McBride (a leading expert on marine refrigeration) worked alongside national designers, engineers and manufacturers to design an efficient, safe and ecologically sustainable refrigeration system for the 1913 schooner. Her galley now includes a fine touch of modern convenience, new Frigoboat Keel-Cooled AC/DC Refrigeration Systems supplied by Go2marine and Coastal Climate Control, North America.

Frigoboat Marine Refrigeration, renowned world-wide as one of the best possible solutions for on-board refrigeration needs, provides a little modern day cruising comfort to a remarkable, historic vessel.

At 133 ft in vessel length, one might think the Adventuress has plenty of space in the galley for this system. Fortunately the two Frigoboat systems nested easily in the only available nook of the galley where the systems supply refrigeration to two new hand crafted 15 cubic ft lockers, one of which houses a smaller freezer.

“Once I learned of their requirements, Frigoboat was really the best choice for the Adventuress” according to Mark, who added “Coastal Climate Control is a top notch company providing support and service to the marine markets for over 25 years and this was also an important factor in choosing Frigoboat systems.” Mark goes on to say that there must be literally thousands of Frigoboat systems in the world, and Frigoboat was chosen in Practical Sailor’s (June 2009) as the winner in the “Frig Chill-off” survey.

 

Frigoboat

Shop Frigoboat Equipment at Go2marine.com

Elliot Lewis & his boat - Bennington Banner / by Peter Crabtree

Students in an engineering class at Bennington, Vermont’s Career Development Center are working to repair the steering and other components of a boat in order to return it to the water.

Elliot Lewis, a 17-year-old senior at Mount Anthony Union High School, is one of the five students in an Engineering 2 class who is trying to restore a 15-foot, 1959 fiberglass and wooden Runabout, the Bennington Banner reports.

“I started out thinking I would do the whole boat, but with time constraints, I decided to just do the lighting and steering instead,” Lewis told the news source.

He added that these components needed the most work. “The steering was non-existent when I started.” Cable and pulley style steering was the standard fitment to a boat of this era. Indeed, helms and cable steering systems have come a long way since those early days of the “close-line” style of steering system with cables running down both sides of the gunwhales to the outboard.

Outboard Steering

Single cable steering systems are most common in smaller boats that are propelled with an outboard. The Uflex Rotech Universal Rotary Cable Steering System, which includes helm, bezel and cable, is ideal for replacement marine boat steering systems.

If you’re replacing a cable steering system, you will need to calculate the cable length. When replacing an existing system, you can usually find the cable part number and length about two feet from the helm connection, imprinted into the cable’s jacket. If you can’t locate or read the numbers on your cable, you can calculate the appropriate steering cable length by measuring the plastic jacket only and adding 18 inches


RAIV (Rigid Aluminum Inflatable Vessel)

In late April, U.S. Navy officials test drove a new boat along the coast of Charleston, Oregon, in preparation for delivering the watercraft for military use. Jay Conn, the general manager of North River Boats of Roseburg said via TheWorldLink.com, “that a sea test is a standard procedure before delivering vessels to the Navy”.

“It’s been a long project,” Conn told the news source. “Basically, it’s coming to a close and we’re preparing it for delivery.” The boat, a hybrid rigid aluminum inflatable vessel (RAIV), is called a force protection vessel in the military and contains inflatable or foam fender collars.

Sausage Fenders

Recreational boats do not have a surrounding foam filled collar, as a force protection vessel would; personal pleasure craft require fenders for protection against abrasions.

Fenders that attach to the rail of a water craft help boat owners avoid scratches or damage while docking and help fend boats off of other objects. Sausage fenders, which commonly hang vertically from the side of the boat, are the most easily stored in racks or lockers. 
generally offer more space between your vessel and the foreign object for increased safety.

Round Fenders

Round fenders generally offer more space between your vessel and the foreign object for increased safety.

To protect your vessel while at dock, during rafting or while your own crew boards from the tender, use fenders as a buffer to keep your vessel looking new. Taylor Made produces a variety of colors and types of fenders to meet docking and rafting needs.

Go2marine in the Press

December 11, 2007

Check out what’s new this season at Go2marine. Visit our Press Release: Navigate into the Holidays with Go2marine.