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Rocking the Boat - Spring 2010

15 years ago the Rocking the Boat volunteer project began as a way to offer teens in South Bronx hope for a better future through creating – then using a boat they built with their own hands. “I get to say [I’m] still in my first job out of college, which is kind of fun,” jokes the founder Adam Green, now 37.

There is weeklong concentration and training period of just using the tools to build the boats before any construction begins, as reported to Stephanie Lin for NBCNewyork.com. It takes 16 students 13 weeks to complete a single boat, from the raw wood and parts to a finished hull ready for the water.

Since August 1998 over 400 students from more than 40 different high schools have been involved in building 22 traditional wooden boats. The program highlights diversity form one of the nations poorest inner city areas. Boys and girls participate in equal numbers, and represent Latino, African-American, West Indian, Indian, Asian, South American, and African cultures. They are drawn mostly from the Bronx but also Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens.

In March, Rocking the Boat officially opened its new 6,000 square foot building in Hunts Point. There is a continued interest in boatbuilding and the opportunity it brings for personal growth and accomplishment.

Although Go2marine did not supply parts to the Rocking the Boat organization, we support special interest groups similar to Rocking the Boat. Go2marine supplies 1000’s of boatbuilders and owners each year with parts and support for projects ranging from non-profit groups to father/son activities to vessel repower and rebuild ventures. With over 170,000 boat parts, ranging from both powerboat and sailboat parts to complete engines and drive systems, there is something for nearly any boater.

Rocking the Boat, boat building project in the Bronx is unique and offers hope and skills that end up on the water and in peoples lives; this is certainly a case of when the boat is more than just a sum of the parts that make it up.

PRI Fuel Treatment, Additive & Stabilizer is available for both gasoline engines as PRI-G and diesel applications as PRI-D. The unique formula can be used in marine engines, RV’s and other fuel situations. With more than 40 years of research and usage, PRI, Power Research Inc is a product that accomplishes just three things for diesel and gasoline fuels (and by extension, in those engines):

1. PRI is a Fuel Stabilizer and Restorer.

2. PRI removes trapped moisture that modern fuels promote.

3. PRI reduces carbon particulate size.

Fuel Additives & Stabilizers by Power Research Inc.

Fuel Additives & Stabilizers by Power Research Inc.

 PRI is the industry leader at restoring old stale fuels. PRI can produce usable gasoline and diesel fuels from the worst storage conditions. Independent laboratory tests have tested 10-13 year old fuels that were restored with PRI and found them returned to usable condition. Treat just once a year for year after year use.

PRI will emulsify and absorb small amounts of water from fuel. While not able to clean water contaminated fuel that has large amounts of water, it does prevent alcohol phase separation. PRI prevents corrosion in the tank as well as everywhere fuel flows and contains asolutely no alcohol.

PRI reduces carbon buildup in small engines, reduces carbon in the exhaust and maintains the carbon size to less than .010 microns. Cleaner burning with less particulates means that engines stay clean on the inside as well as the outside.

PRI marginally increases the octane in gasoline and increases the cetane (diesel) rating by 1-2 points. PRI-D is suitable for diesel #1, diesel #2, kerosene, home heating oil, ULS diesel, marine diesel and marine gas oil. PRI-G is suitable for all octane ratings of gasoline. Although they are formulated for specific fuels, using PRI-D in a gasoline engine (or vice veras) will cause no harm.

Fuel Additives & Stabilizers by Power Research Inc.

Fuel Additives & Stabilizers by Power Research Inc.

Testimonials often have some value, but these unique testimonials will have you thinking that this ‘witches brew’ is one that deserves to be added to your current tank of fuel.

Diesel Smoke Control – Bob White with his 38′ Bertram “Island Time” had a problem. The real challenge was how to get two stroke 6-71 Detroit Diesels, which are known for their smoking, to stop being so dirty. PRI-D solves this problem because it works as a carbon breaker; it never allows clumps of carbon to form in the engine or exhaust larger than .010 microns. That means that smoke is far less visible and that the transom stays cleaner (and is easier to clean!). – Motorboating Magazine, May 2001.

Fresh Fuel – How old is your fuel? If your fuel is stored for longer than a season, it starts to degrade. Howard Freilich the owner of Qescorp Inc. had a unique problem. They run a recycling business, from saw blades to fuel – that’s right, fuel. Qescorp has tested PRI-G added to 15 year old fuel from salvage yards. One quart of PRI-G mixed well with 300 gallons of fuel, then left to stand for 48 hours resulted in a usable fuel that complies with the fuel specifications of all engine manufacturers. – New York Times Upfront, Summer 2007.

E-10 Fuel – Call it Gasohol or Ethanol mix / blend or just E10, it is here to stay. Ethanol is added to gas and it reduces dangerous emissions (good) and is hydroscopic (bad). Ethanol is so good at attracting moisture, like condensation, that when it gets saturated, it simple drops the water (which is called phase separation) which then sinks to the bottom of the tank while alcohol continues to attract more water! PRI-G is a non-alcohol fuel stabilizer (alcohol attracts water!) that functions as a carbon dispersant as well. It keeps outboards running clean. – Boat Digest

‘Servicing’ Older OutboardsPRI-G is essential to maintaining your older outboard in “just serviced” condition. After electrical issues, fuel is a close second. When added to your tank and run through the outboard, PRI-G can make a noticable difference in smooth running and will preserve the parts that the fuel runs through; the carb and fuel pump. When you service your engine, service your fuel! – Motorboating Magazine, January 2002.

Keeping Out The Water – Because “future fuels” like E-10 are here now, the choices of fuel additives has grown on the market. One of the most common (and affordable) component of fuel additives is alcohol. When added to fuel, alcohol makes the fuel burn cleaner, with a 1.5% loss in mpg. Alcohol has undesirable characteristics of being hydroscopic (attracting water) as well as being a potent solvent, additionally, most gas additives were designed for the automotive industry and are not for marine use.  – Saltwater Fly Fishing, Dec 2006/Jan 2007.

Diesel Fuel Oil – The Tennesse Valley Authority had a problem, a big problem; they had 1.8 million gallons of bad fuel. The PAD (Petroleum Administration for Defense) rating was a high of 17, making the fuel unusable. The fuel was fully treated with PRI-D and then retested. The fuel was now at a PAD of 3, fully meeting TVA specifications. – Recyclers Power Source.

Fuel Additives & Stabilizers by Power Research Inc. Outboard Gas – An outboard is only as good as it’s gas. Some fuels gum up quicker, some age faster and some build up more carbon. Adding PRI-G to your tank prevents gumming of the fuel, contamination of the carburetor and build-up of carbon that causes these small work horses to falter. Carbon build-up is a hidden killer of these engines. When too much carbon accumulates, the rings are pushed higher and higher (called “ring jacking”). The increased friction between the rings and cylinders causes elevated temperatures, accelerated wear and ultimately, power head failure. PRI-G dramatically reduces carbon build-up by reducing the size of the carbon cluster.  – Field and Stream, September 2000.

Go2marine carries PRI-D, PRI-G and PRI-OCIDE.

USCG and Go2marine Products

September 17, 2008

Go2marine carries products that are purchased and used by the USCG, the United States military, the Canadian, British and Mexican Governments as well as rescue services in many other countries.

USCG 47' Motor Life Boat

USCG 47

The USCG 47′ Textron MLB

The United States Coast Guard Motor Life Boat (MLB) built by Textron is capable of self righting in less than 10 seconds and withstanding winds of 60 knots and 20′ breaking surf. The USCG 47′ MLB has military application as well as being manufactured for rescue services in foreign countries. The products that go into building one of the most rugged rescue boats ever conceived come from a number of sources;

Balmar – High output Marine DC Charging Systems

Balmar Marine DC Charging Systems

Balmar Marine DC Charging Systems

Balmar manufactures marine charging systems fitted to the MLB’s, constructed as a lightweight generator for the US Marine Corp and the Canadian Department of Defense. Balmar’s unique alternators, regulators and charge regulators capable of multiple engines and multiple batteries are built for use in cruising power and sailboats as well as work vessels. As an industry leader, Balmar is creating marine worthy high output alternators, intelligent voltage regulation and temperature monitors to meet the charging needs of boats with newer battery types and increased electrical demands.

Baier Hatches – Watertight marine Hatches

Baier Watertight Marine Hatches

Baier Watertight Marine Hatches

Baier Hatches exceed the demands of the USCG 47′ MLB which is certified to withstand vessel impacts of three times the acceleration of gravity. From the USCG to Research and Work vessels, Baier manufactures aluminum and steel hatches to meet rigorous off shore marine duty. There are only 2 moving parts when securing the hatch to the deck ring of the Baier patented strong-back system. All Baier hatches have been approved by the US Coast Guard, the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS), the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Canadian Department of Transportation.

 

PYI Inc. Packless Sealing System Shaft Seal

PYI Inc. Packless Sealing System Shaft Seal

PYI Inc. – Packless Sealing System (PSS) Shaft Seals

When Textron builds the 47′ USCG motor life boat, they want shaft seals that can stand up to 30′ following seas in a 40,000 pound boat powered by Two 435 Hp Detroit Diesels. The PYI shaft seals stand up to punishing conditions, are dripless and require reduced maintenance while serving a hard, long service life. PYI PSS shaft seals are built to fit most mariners needs, from 3/4″ to 6″ shaft sizes, with metric shafts also, from 22-95 mm with custom sizes to 140mm.

 

Stearns Service / Industrial Equipment

Stearns Service / Industrial Equipment

Stearn’s Industrial – USCG, Mariners & Law Enforcement

Stearns Industrial safety and survival equipment includes USCG and Law enforcement marked floatation equipment and suits. From Commercial Type 1 vest’s (PFD’s) to Rescue Suits, Immersion Suits and Flotation Jackets, Stearns provides quality USCG approved safety equipment for working and survival in harsh conditions. Whether you are a fisherman, kayaker, sailor, boater – out on the water for play or work, Stearns manufactures equipment for your safety in the marine environment.

Go2marine is proud to carry these products and supports both recreational boaters and professional mariners. Go2marine’s products and information are featured on National Fisherman and the Go2marine Boaters Community.

Power Boat Spring Preparation Checklist: Go2marine is proud to help you get ready! My general rule of thumb is to plan on spending 10 hours to do everything (for a vessel under 30’), then add 5 more hours for complex systems. You will spend 15 hours readying your 30’ vessel for use over the next season. For a 40’, double the time (30 hours), for a 50’ double the time, again (60 hours).

I also advocate doing those ‘one time’ jobs you have put off for so long, like labeling all the diesel engine bleed locations and hanging a wrench near one to make it easy to do! 

This is a quick, check list (you may copy and paste; then print it out – or just print everything). I kept the text to a minimum and this will print out to six pages. – on the trailer or tied to a dock. This list covers POWER large and small power boats 

POWER VESSELS, including trailer

GENERAL: getting the boat ready to inspect

Go2marine helps you get ready

  • Do a general cleaning of hull, deck and topsides using a mild , environmental safe detergent
  • Make sure drains and scuppers are clear
  • Put on a good coat of wax in all hull topsides
  • Clean and polish metal with a good metal polish
  • Clean teak (and other wood) and oil to reseal
  • Clean windows and hatches, clean screens
  • Clean canvas, bimini and dodger (use same soap)
  • Clean interior including bilges
  • Check spare parts and tools and replace as necessary
  • Make sure registration is current and onboard
  • Check and replace wiper blades if necessary

HULL: outside inspection

Marine Maintenance & Hardware Supplies

  • Check for hull abrasions, scratches, gouges, etc. and repair
  • Check and replace zincs
  • Check for blisters and refinish is necessary
  • Check rub rails, has anything come loose?
  • Check swim platform and/or ladder
  • Inspect and test trim tabs
  • Check shaft, cutlass bearing, strut and prop
  • Lubricate stuffing boxes, shaft and rudder logs
  • Check rudder and fittings
  • Touch up or replace antifouling paint, boot strip paint

DECK, FITTINGS, SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

Deck, Cockpit & Hull

  • Check stanchion, pulpits and lifelines for integrity
  • Check ground tackle, anchor, rode and backup anchor / rode, etc.
  • Check lines, fenders, etc.
  • Check cleats and deck fittings
  • Check hull/deck joint
  • Check deck, windows, and port lights for leaks
  • Inspect anchor windlass and lubricate
  • Check dinghy, and life raft

BELOW DECKS: if it is in the back of a locker, or hidden below floorboards – check it now!

Plumbing Fittings and Valves

  • Check, test and lubricate seacocks
  • Check all thruhull fittings
  • Check condition of hoses and clamps
  • Make sure below waterline hoses are double clamped
  • Check bilges pumps for automatic and manual operation
  • Check for oil in bilges
  • Check limber holes and make sure they are clear of debris

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM AND COMPONENTS:

Marine Electrical Equipment and Supplies

  • Check battery water level – the single most often ignored task
  • Check/recharge batteries
  • Check terminals for corrosion, clean and lubricate
  • Check bonding system
  • Inspect all wiring for wear and chafe
  • Test all gauges for operability
  • Check shore power and charger
  • Check for spare fuses or breakers
  • Check all lighting fixtures (including navigation lights) and make sure you have spare bulbs
  • Check all electronics for proper operation
  • Inspect antennas

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED EQUIPMENT:

Safety & Flotation

  • Sound signaling device – spare air can for air horn
  • Check distress signals and expiration date
  • Check PFDs (lifejackets)
  • Inspect life rings and cushions
  • Check fire extinguishers certification and recharge if necessary
  • Check and adjust compass
  • Check navigation lights
  • Check charts and replace as necessary
  • Check radar reflector
  • Check and replace first aid supplies
  • Check bailer and hand pump

INBOARD ENGINE(S):

Browse Inboard Engine Parts

  • Change oil & filters – have spare oil & filters onboard
  • Check and change fuel filters – have spares onboard
  • Check and change engine zincs
  • Check cooling system change coolant as necessary – have extra onboard
  • Record engine maintenance log, especially date & hours of last oil changes
  • Check belts for tension – carry spare(s)
  • Check transmission fluid
  • Check and clean backfire flame arrestor
  • Check impeller
  • Check and clean water strainer
  • Check bilge blower
  • Adjust valves, general service engine

OUTBOARD MOTOR:

Browse Outboard Engine Parts

  • Replace spark plugs
  • Check plug wires for wear
  • Check prop for nicks and bends
  • Change/fill gear lube
  • Inspect fuel lines, primer bulb and tank for leaks
  • Lubricate and spray moveable parts

HEAD SYSTEM:

Toilets & Sanitary Systems

  • Checked for smooth operation – lubricate and clean as necessary
  • If equipped with treatment system, have chemicals on hand
  • Y-valve operation checked, valve labeled & secured

WATER SYSTEM:

Freshwater Systems

  • Flush water tank
  • Shock the drinking water tank. Spa shock breaks down in a few days and then can be flushed out
  • Replace water filters
  • Check water system and pump for leaks and proper operation
  • Check hot water tank working on both AC and engines
  • Check for tank cap keys on board
  • Check and clean shower sump pump screens

GALLEY:

Galley

  • Fill propane (fuel) tank, check electric & manual valves, check storage box vent to make sure it is clear
  • Check refrigerator, clean and freshen, operate on AC and DC
  • Clean stove, check that all burners and oven are working
  • Check microwave, other appliances, if fitted

TRAILER:

Trailering Parts & Accessories

  • Check for current registration
  • Check rollers and pads
  • Check and lubricate wheel bearings
  • Clean and lubricate winch
  • Lubricate tongue jack and wheel
  • Test lights and electrical connections
  • Check tire pressure and condition
  • Check brakes (if equipped)
  • Check safety chains
  • Check tongue lock

Sailboat Spring Preparation Checklist: Go2marine is proud to help you get ready! My general rule of thumb is to plan on spending 10 hours to do everything (for a vessel under 30’), then add 5 more hours for complex systems. You will spend 15 hours readying your 30’ vessel for use over the next season. For a 40’, double the time (30 hours), for a 50’ double the time, again (60 hours).

I also advocate doing those ‘one time’ jobs you have put off for so long, like opening and repacking your sails and labeling all the sailing bags! 

This is a quick, check list (you may copy and paste; then print it out – or just print everything). I kept the text to a minimum and this will print out to six pages. I cannot emphasize how useful it is to look everything over, at the start of the year – on the trailer or tied to a dock. This list covers Sailing vessels, large and small sailboats 

SAILING VESSELS, including trailer

GENERAL: getting the boat ready to inspect

Go2marine helps you get ready

  • Do a general cleaning of hull, deck and topsides using a mild , environmental safe detergent
  • Make sure drains and scuppers are clear
  • Put on a good coat of wax in all hull topsides
  • Clean and polish metal with a good metal polish
  • Clean teak (and other wood) and oil to reseal
  • Clean windows and hatches, clean screens
  • Clean canvas, bimini and dodger (use same soap)
  • Clean sail covers
  • Clean interior including bilges
  • Check spare parts and tools and replace as necessary
  • Make sure registration is current and onboard
  • Check and replace wiper blades if necessary

HULL:

Marine Maintenance & Hardware Supplies

  • Check for hull abrasions, scratches, gouges, etc. and repair
  • Check and replace zincs
  • Check for blisters and refinish is necessary
  • Check rub rails, has anything come loose?
  • Check swim platform and/or ladder
  • Check shaft, cutlass bearing, strut and prop
  • Check rudder and fittings
  • Touch up or replace antifouling paint

DECK, FITTINGS, SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

Deck, Cockpit & Hull

  • Check stanchion, pulpits and lifelines for integrity
  • Check ground tackle, anchor, rode and backup anchor / rode, etc
  • Check lines, fenders, etc.
  • Check chainplates, cleats and other deck fittings
  • Check hull/deck joint
  • Check deck, windows, and port lights for leaks
  • Inspect anchor windlass and lubricate
  • Clean and grease winches
  • Check and lubricate blocks, pad eyes, etc.
  • Check dinghy, and life raft

BELOW DECKS:

Plumbing Fittings and Valves

  • Check, test and lubricate seacocks
  • Check all thruhull fittings
  • Check condition of hoses and clamps
  • Make sure below waterline hoses are double clamped
  • Check bilges pumps for automatic and manual operation
  • Check for oil in bilges
  • Check limber holes and make sure they are clear of debris

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM AND COMPONENTS:

Marine Electrical Equipment and Supplies

  • Check battery water level – the single most often ignored task
  • Check/recharge batteries
  • Check terminals for corrosion, clean and lubricate
  • Check bonding system
  • Inspect all wiring for wear and chafe
  • Test all gauges for operability
  • Check shore power and charger
  • Check for spare fuses or breakers
  • Check all lighting fixtures (including navigation lights) and make sure you have spare bulbs
  • Check all electronics for proper operation
  • Inspect antennas

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED EQUIPMENT:

Safety & Flotation

  • Sound signaling device – spare air can for air horn
  • Check distress signals and expiration date
  • Check PFDs (lifejackets)
  • Inspect life rings and cushions
  • Check fire extinguishers certification and recharge if necessary
  • Check and adjust compass
  • Check navigation lights
  • Check charts and replace as necessary
  • Check radar reflector
  • Check and replace first aid supplies
  • Check bailer and hand pump

INBOARD ENGINE(S):

Browse Inboard Engine Parts

  • Change oil & filters – have spare oil & filters onboard
  • Check and change fuel filters – have spares onboard
  • Check and change engine zincs
  • Check cooling system change coolant as necessary – have extra onboard
  • Record engine maintenance log, especially date & hours of last oil changes
  • Check belts for tension – carry spare(s)
  • Check transmission fluid
  • Check and clean backfire flame arrestor
  • Check impeller
  • Check and clean water strainer
  • Check bilge blower
  • Adjust valves, general service engine

OUTBOARD MOTOR:

Browse Outboard Engine Parts

  • Replace spark plugs
  • Check plug wires for wear
  • Check prop for nicks and bends
  • Change/fill gear lube
  • Inspect fuel lines, primer bulb and tank for leaks
  • Lubricate and spray moveable parts

HEAD SYSTEM:

Toilets & Sanitary Systems

  • Checked for smooth operation – lubricate and clean as necessary
  • If equipped with treatment system, have chemicals on hand
  • Y-valve operation checked, valve labeled & secured

WATER SYSTEM:

Freshwater Systems

  • Flush water tank
  • Shock the drinking water tank. Spa shock breaks down in a few days and then can be flushed out
  • Check water system and pump for leaks and proper operation
  • Check hot water tank working on both AC and engines
  • Check for tank cap keys on board
  • Check and clean shower sump pump screens

GALLEY:

Galley

  • Fill propane tank, check electric & manual valves, check storage box vent to make sure it is clear
  • Check refrigerator, clean and freshen, operate on AC and DC
  • Clean stove, check that all burners and oven are working
  • Check microwave, if fitted

TRAILER:

Trailering Parts & Accessories

  • Check for current registration
  • Check rollers and pads
  • Check and lubricate wheel bearings
  • Clean and lubricate winch
  • Lubricate tongue jack and wheel
  • Test lights and electrical connections
  • Check tire pressure and condition
  • Check brakes (if equipped)
  • Check safety chains
  • Check tongue lock

SAILS:

Sailing

  • Check general condition
  • Look for wear and chafing
  • Check battens and batten pockets
  • Check all sail attachments, including grommets, rings, and all reef-points
  • Inspect all of the stitching on the sail edges and all seams. Pay close attention to the leech of the headsail
  • Inspect bolt rope

MAST AND RIGGING:

Rigging Hardware

  • Check mast and spreaders for corrosion or damage
  • Inspect spreader boots and shrouds
  • Inspect rivets and screw connections for corrosion
  • Check reefing points and reefing gear
  • Clean and lube sail track
  • Check rigging, turnbuckles and clevis pins for wear and corrosion
  • Inspect stays for fraying and “fish hooks”
  • Check forestay and backstay connections
  • Check masthead fitting and pulleys
  • Check and lubricate roller furling
  • Check halyards and consider replacing or swapping end for end
  • Tape turnbuckles, cotter pins, and spreaders