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Jeff Adams Go2marine Operations Manager

“We’re on this little island in the Puget Sound, but we’re reaching boaters all around the world.” 

Jeff Adams, Go2marine Operations Manager

Google recently featured Go2marine in an Economic Impact Report showing how businesses use the web and eCommerce tools to grow business and a world wide customer base.

Go2marine has called a small island in Washington State’s Puget Sound home since 1999, but does business with customers around the world. Bainbridge Island was selected as a 2013 Google eCity Award recipient for Washington state as one of the strongest online business communities.

Read what Google had to say about Go2marine here!

 

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Old Boat, New Tricks

May 6, 2014

The Adventuress

The schooner Adventuress was designed by B.B. Crowninshield and built at the Rice Brothers Yard in East Boothbay, Maine. She launched in 1913; a two-masted, gaff-rigged schooner owned by John Borden II of Chicago. Borden commissioned the vessel for his personal use in the Arctic, where he planned to collect specimens including a bowhead whale skeleton for the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

 

John Bordon behind the wheel in 1913

Borden’s efforts to acquire a whale never reached fruition, Adventuress was later sold to the San Francisco Bar Pilots Association where she was used as a work boat for the next 35 years.

She transferred pilots to and from cargo vessels before being commissioned during WWII as a United States Coast Guard vessel assigned to guard San Francisco Bay.

AdventuressIn the 1950’s, the Adventuress was brought to Seattle and the Puget Sound. In the early 1960’s, Monty Morton acquired her, restoring much of her original lines which had been altered during her years as a working boat. Her topmasts, gaff rig and bowsprit returned and the main boom was lengthened to increase her sail area. She was then used for sail training by Youth Adventures, a non-profit organization closely tied with Scouting. In the late 1980’s, Sound Experience, another educational non-profit, began conducting educational programs aboard Adventuress continuing the ship’s youth mission. In recognition of her national significance, she was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1989.

She is currently owned and operated by Sound Experience, a Seattle area nonprofit organization who’s mission is to Educate, Inspire and Empower their community to make a difference for the future of our marine environment. Over 3,000 participants each year experience hands-on, experiential, on-the-water programs encouraging stewardship, teaching sustainability and promoting awareness of the ocean and estuarine environment.

In the past two decades alone, more than 60,000 have sailed aboard learning about the marine environment, and how their daily actions make a difference in its future. She is one of only two National Historic Landmark ships still sailing on the west coast, and one of the region’s most recognizable maritime icons.

Rig: Gaff Topsail Two-masted Schooner
Over all Length: 133 feet
Deck Length: 101 feet
Length at the Waterline: 71 feet
Beam: 21 feet
Draft: 12 feet
Rig Height: 110 feet
Sail Area: 5,478 sq. feet
Sail Number: TS15
Gross Tonnage: 98 tons
Auxiliary Engine: 250 hp diesel
Hull: Wood
Designer: B.B. Crowninshield
Commissioned: 1913
Builder: Rice Brothers East Boothbay, Maine

Adventuress Boater's BlogIn January of 2010, Sound Experience began a $1.2 million dollar Centennial Restoration Project leading up to Adventuress’ 100th birthday in 2013.

The project spanned a number of years and funded by grants and donations. January through April of 2010, Phase I of the restoration replaced forward port topside frames and planks (67 new futtocks and 840 feet of planking), fore chain plate, stem, fo’c’sle bunks, and anchor & headrig configuration.

Phase II & III took place November 2010 through March 2011, resulting in the re-framing of the starboard bow and the restoration of the Counter Stern. In January 2012 Phase IV began, focusing on the  propeller shaft. The following November through March of 2013, the below water-line port side was re-framed.

Mark

Schooner Adventuress “Splashes” with State of the Art Refrigeration

The 101 year old gaff-rigged historic schooner Adventuress re-launched April of 2014 in Port Townsend following the completion of a $1.2 million, five year Centennial Restoration Project.

Go2marine’s Mark McBride (a leading expert on marine refrigeration) worked alongside national designers, engineers and manufacturers to design an efficient, safe and ecologically sustainable refrigeration system for the 1913 schooner. Her galley now includes a fine touch of modern convenience, new Frigoboat Keel-Cooled AC/DC Refrigeration Systems supplied by Go2marine and Coastal Climate Control, North America.

Frigoboat Marine Refrigeration, renowned world-wide as one of the best possible solutions for on-board refrigeration needs, provides a little modern day cruising comfort to a remarkable, historic vessel.

At 133 ft in vessel length, one might think the Adventuress has plenty of space in the galley for this system. Fortunately the two Frigoboat systems nested easily in the only available nook of the galley where the systems supply refrigeration to two new hand crafted 15 cubic ft lockers, one of which houses a smaller freezer.

“Once I learned of their requirements, Frigoboat was really the best choice for the Adventuress” according to Mark, who added “Coastal Climate Control is a top notch company providing support and service to the marine markets for over 25 years and this was also an important factor in choosing Frigoboat systems.” Mark goes on to say that there must be literally thousands of Frigoboat systems in the world, and Frigoboat was chosen in Practical Sailor’s (June 2009) as the winner in the “Frig Chill-off” survey.

 

Frigoboat

Shop Frigoboat Equipment at Go2marine.com

Keeping Cool

 

The Taylor Made Bimini Comfort Zone Misting System can be used to reduce the air temperatures in a local area by as much as 30 degrees. This innovative stand-alone misting system can be attached to a dodger, bimini, radar arch, wing, tower or any overhead area to supply you with a steady, cooling mist.  

The misting systems usefulness extends far beyond the weekend boater. Any hot weather boater, from a small sport fishing boat to a waterski tournament boat to an off shore cruising sailboat can benefit from this simple system. Additionally, and vehicle that uses a 12 volt power source and is able to carry water can take advantage of misting cooling. This portable misting system can be used with an RV while camping, while off-roading at Moab or to keep you cool in your cart when golfing. 

The Taylor Made 1420 Comfort Zone Misting System contains:  

  • 130 psi 12 volt booster pump w/mounting bracket
  • Quick “Push to Connect” tee connectors
  • 25′ of 1/4″ diameter black misting line
  • 7′ red water inlet tubing w/screened weighted anchor
  • 4 misting nozzles w/T-connector push-to-connect fittings
  • 4 mounting clips to attach nozzle to top
  • AC adapter plug
  • Pre-inline sediment filter

All that you supply is the electricity and water**. The water source must be clean, fresh water (not salt or brackish water). While running, the system uses approximately 1 gallon of water per nozzle per hour. Go2marine offers this useful product as well as over 160,000 other useful boat parts to make your boating enjoyable! 

** Never mix electricity and water, you will need to supply both the source of each as well as their dispensing containers.

Go2marine carries ClearView Ragasco fiberglass lpg propane cylinders…

ClearView Ragasco fiberglass propane tanks are perfect for many outdoor activities. A customer called us recently to request a set of these propane tanks. The use was unique, but not rare; the customer was looking for a better, less expensive LPG cylinder than an aluminum propane tank. His designated purpose for the clear view propane tank was for horse packing, to be used when leading overnight trips. The corroded steel tanks that had been banging around in pack boxes were to be replaced with rugged fiberglass tanks that were lighter and corrosion resistant.

Attractive, Easy to see the level of fuel and Ruggedly built make this propane tank perfect for many outdoor activities.

Clear View Fiberglass Propane Tanks, 10 & 20 Pound Gallon Tanks

Primary benefits of the Clear View Fiberglass Propane Tank by Ragasco are:

  • Lightweight – 50% lighter than steel
  • Translucent tank always shows the volume of fuel
  • Rugged – on par with metal tanks in safety tests
  • Corrosion proof
  • Quiet, no banging metal

The Clear View fiberglass propane tanks are made in 2 useful sizes, 3 and 5 gallons. The uses for this tank can be found with many Overland or Eco-tour companies, including:

  • Commercial river rafting
  • Horse packing and guiding
  • Jetboat and airboat tours
  • Large sea kayak trips
  • Desert excursions
  • Sailing and power boating
  • Overland vehicle tours
  • Teardrop and vintage trailers
  • Field camp support
  • Fly-in fishing and hunting camps
  • as well as powering propane campfires on Eco-tours in sensitive areas

So, whether you have a Yurt with a stove or a boat with a BBQ, these tanks will make things just a little bit easier!

Nick Gill has written the following comprehensive article to help you select the proper gear if you are participating in the Newport – Bermuda race. However the information is valuable for any sailing adventure.

I became involved in the technical sailing clothing business back in 1975 because at the time there was so little choice, particularly for the competitive dinghy sailor. Thirty years on things have gone to the other extreme, there is literally so much choice, from so many brands that chances are you will end up confused on what is right for you. The danger is you will leave the decision making for another year and end up cold wet and uncomfortable.

A few key headline points to consider which emphasize the need to have the right clothing.

  • Being cold and wet makes you tire easily and reduces your reaction time
  • With the right choice you should never have to be cold again
  • Cotton clothing absorbs moisture and up to 25% of its own weight, once it is wet it will stay wet for the duration
  • Wet or damp materials transfers heat 20 times quicker than dry fabrics do
  • Cotton should remain onshore and be replaced by technical quick dry polyester materials

Conditions

The race can begin in cold and windy conditions, and end in the sweltering heat and light airs, and probably most things in between. Night sailing is always a lot colder and depending on the size of boat could be between three and six days. These diverse conditions mean your kit bag will need a wide range of gear.

Layering – A Personal Climate Control System

I believe it is best to look at your options in terms of layers. Hot or cold, the layering system makes enormous sense and functions as your personal climate control system.

The Base Layer is vital.
One of its main purposes is to keep you dry next to the skin and it does this by wicking moisture away from the body. In an hour of moderate exercise the body gives off half a liter of water – it has to go somewhere – and if you are wearing cotton it literally absorbs the water much like blotting paper. Once wet or even damp, it will transfer heat from your body 20 times faster than dry fabric. Remember that sailing is a sport where you can be sitting still for long periods then along comes a sail change or requirement to put a reef in and all hell breaks loose for a few minutes. You then sit down again. If you are wearing cotton clothing next to the skin it will absorb the moisture and suck the heat out of your body, leaving you feeling cold and clammy and tired.

Base Layer Options

For the cooler part of the journey I recommend Gill i2 Lite. There are many choices of long or short sleeve, Crew Neck or Zip Polo as well as Leggings and Boxer Shorts. Don’t forget the boxers as damp cotton underwear is no fun!

For warmer conditions, Gill has introduced technical long and short sleeve shirts. They are very fast drying, highly wicking and have a UV SPF 50 sun protection factor, essential for the latter part of the ARC rally. This new Technical Apparel range has a natural feel, is not tight fitting and is very comfortable for long periods.

The key elements of the Technical Apparel range are;

  • Fast Drying
  • Fast Wicking
  • UV Protection to SPF 50
  • A Natural Feel

All garments adhere to these principals and also feature a water repellent finish so water beads off rather than soaks in. However warm and dry it is on a boat it is inevitable there will be damp decks and spray around at times.

The Mid Layer is the insulation or thermostat control.
Just as Gill has a simple classification system for durability of the outer layer fabrics, our base and mid layers also have a straightforward classification system. It is known as the i37 body temperature regulating system – 37 degrees centigrade being the natural body temperature. The i series goes from i2 to i5 increasing in warmth as you go up the scale.

Gill Mid-Layer Options

i3 Micro Fleece Mid Layer: A lightweight fleece. This is a super soft and close fitting fleece providing warmth without bulk and comes in a top and trousers. In predominantly mild conditions but with cooler nights it is ideal under foul weather gear.

i4 Fleece Mid Layer: This range is made in Polartec Classic 200 mid weight fleece and is available in a Zip Jacket, Zip Smock and Salopettes. It is slim fitting and flat seamed which is ideal as a mid layer and for wearing under the outer layer. As with all technical fleeces the i4 is quick drying. I particularly recommend the i4 Salopettes, as these are great to sleep in too.

i5 Shelled Mid Layers: I believe the ultimate mid-layer is the Crosswind Jacket and Crosswind Salopettes. The outer layer is a lightweight waterproof laminated fabric. It is highly breathable. The insulation is an ultra compact material giving exceptional warmth without bulk. It is hydrophobic (water hating) meaning it can still keep you warm when wet. Combine these materials with a taffeta lining and the garments become so easy to slip on unlike a fleece lined garment. An added bonus is the garment has taped seams and can be worn on it’s own in moderate conditions.

Another relatively new concept is Gill Softshell. A sandwiched lamination of different materials giving warmth, wind and water resistance with stretch, giving appareled comfort in sailing wear. The Gill Softshell race jacket and pants are perfect as a mid layer or in warmer conditions as an outer layer.

The Outer Layer is the protection.
There are three suitable options in the Gill range depending how much you want to spend. Regardless of which you select, you will need a Jacket and Chest High Trousers.

The main difference between the garment options is the height of the collar and the durability of the materials. There are two types of material available, 2-layer and 3-layer.

2-Layer Fabric is generally lighter and because the coating is unprotected requires a lining in the garment. It is also less expensive and slightly less durable.

3-Layer fabrics are a sandwich with the waterproof membrane in the middle. The outer fabric gives the texture and the abrasion and snag resistance whereas the inner is a scrim and this protects the coating from wear and tear. Our 3-layer garments are the most durable, do not need a lining but are also more expensive owing not just to the fabric cost (more than 50% higher) but also the taping costs both in materials and labor.

Outer Layer Options

Key West: Our most suitable 2-layer garment is the Key West Coastal Offshore Jacket and Trousers. It is mid-weight, packed with features, has a collar that ends just at the top of the ears and is the most suitable suit for a wide range of conditions. If most of your sailing is coastal cruising with the occasional offshore passage, then Key West will do the job. It is reasonably priced, comes in Unisex and women’s specific sizing and the women’s trousers have a very useful drop seat.

Atlantic: As its name implies, the Atlantic is perfect for the job. It is made using a 3-layer fabric, heavier and more durable and it has a much higher collar. If you do a fair amount of offshore sailing and the occasional race then this would be my recommendation. Atlantic is made in our 5-dot Ocean grade fabric and was restyled for 2006.

Ocean Racer: If budget is less of an issue there is the Ocean Racer Jacket combining the superb features of the Atlantic suit but with many innovative design systems that reduce weight and improve the garment breathability but without sacrificing performance.

This is achieved by material selection; reducing flaps and overlays to a minimum and a cut that makes the garment so comfortable to wear. This is the range that Gill developed during the last Volvo Ocean Race with the crew of Illbruck, the overall winner. The performance to weight ratio was key to them.

Hands and Feet.
The most common injuries on boats are to the hands and feet. Stubbing your toe because you don’t have shoes on is one thing but slipping and ending up overboard is quite another.

Footwear Options

Last year Gill launched a new shoe called the “Gripper”. As the name implies, the grip is outstanding. We test all our footwear on a slip rig at an independent footwear testing house. It tests in wet and dry conditions, on varnished wood and glass fibre decking – the latter was something I had to supply as it was not in their usual manual! The slip resistance on the shoe went off the scale and surpassed anything we had tested before. It is achieved through a very soft rubber compound and a flexible sole. The sole is also very flat on the ground so you feel very secure as it literally wraps around the deck.

Glove Options

Gloves are also important, not just to protect from rope burn but also from getting fingers caught or trapped. There are many options but I would strongly recommend long finger gloves. The Gill Pro-Glove is probably the toughest on the market using a material known as Proton Ultra as opposed to the thinner Amara.

I cannot say that I have done the Newport-Bermuda race, but who knows one day I may get the opportunity. If I did this is what I would take from what I guess some people would see as an envious amount of choice. A mere 50,000 pieces of technical sailing clothing just a few feet away from me at any one time.

Gill Sailing GearStarted in 1975 Gill Sailing Gear was created with the idea that you could make sailing wear that would keep you warm and dry at a reasonable cost. Since then Gill has become one of the most respected and desired names in the sailing world.With their layering guide and dot system, it’s easy to find exactly what you need to keep you warm and protected no matter what the weather.

Gill’s Layering Guide:

Base Layer: This layer worn next to the skin is designed to move moisture out, away from your skin. Keeps you warm by moving the moisture created from bursts of energy away from the body. Also insulates you during especially cold days.

Gill’s Base Layer at Go2marine.com

Mid Layer: This layer is the primary insulating layer, to be worn over the base layer but below the protective outer layer. Made of synthetic fibers that do not absorb water it will keep you warm. Gill has different fabric weights to choose from depending on personal preference and weather conditions.

Gill’s Mid Layer at Go2marine.com 

Gill Coast Sport JacketOuter or Protective Layer: Created purely to keep the elements out. This layer does not have any insulating properties, however it will prevent the wind and water from entering those important mid and base layers. In order to work most efficiently, the fabric is breathable to allow moist air that builds up inside escape. 

Gill’s Outer Layer at Go2marine.com 

To further ensure you stay warm, dry and comfortable, Gill has built a selection of footwear, hats and accessories. Footwear styles include breathable, waterproof leather boots, neoprene shoes and rubber gripper boots.

Gill’s Footwear at Go2marine.com

Sailboat Spring Preparation Checklist: Go2marine is proud to help you get ready! My general rule of thumb is to plan on spending 10 hours to do everything (for a vessel under 30’), then add 5 more hours for complex systems. You will spend 15 hours readying your 30’ vessel for use over the next season. For a 40’, double the time (30 hours), for a 50’ double the time, again (60 hours).

I also advocate doing those ‘one time’ jobs you have put off for so long, like opening and repacking your sails and labeling all the sailing bags! 

This is a quick, check list (you may copy and paste; then print it out – or just print everything). I kept the text to a minimum and this will print out to six pages. I cannot emphasize how useful it is to look everything over, at the start of the year – on the trailer or tied to a dock. This list covers Sailing vessels, large and small sailboats 

SAILING VESSELS, including trailer

GENERAL: getting the boat ready to inspect

Go2marine helps you get ready

  • Do a general cleaning of hull, deck and topsides using a mild , environmental safe detergent
  • Make sure drains and scuppers are clear
  • Put on a good coat of wax in all hull topsides
  • Clean and polish metal with a good metal polish
  • Clean teak (and other wood) and oil to reseal
  • Clean windows and hatches, clean screens
  • Clean canvas, bimini and dodger (use same soap)
  • Clean sail covers
  • Clean interior including bilges
  • Check spare parts and tools and replace as necessary
  • Make sure registration is current and onboard
  • Check and replace wiper blades if necessary

HULL:

Marine Maintenance & Hardware Supplies

  • Check for hull abrasions, scratches, gouges, etc. and repair
  • Check and replace zincs
  • Check for blisters and refinish is necessary
  • Check rub rails, has anything come loose?
  • Check swim platform and/or ladder
  • Check shaft, cutlass bearing, strut and prop
  • Check rudder and fittings
  • Touch up or replace antifouling paint

DECK, FITTINGS, SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

Deck, Cockpit & Hull

  • Check stanchion, pulpits and lifelines for integrity
  • Check ground tackle, anchor, rode and backup anchor / rode, etc
  • Check lines, fenders, etc.
  • Check chainplates, cleats and other deck fittings
  • Check hull/deck joint
  • Check deck, windows, and port lights for leaks
  • Inspect anchor windlass and lubricate
  • Clean and grease winches
  • Check and lubricate blocks, pad eyes, etc.
  • Check dinghy, and life raft

BELOW DECKS:

Plumbing Fittings and Valves

  • Check, test and lubricate seacocks
  • Check all thruhull fittings
  • Check condition of hoses and clamps
  • Make sure below waterline hoses are double clamped
  • Check bilges pumps for automatic and manual operation
  • Check for oil in bilges
  • Check limber holes and make sure they are clear of debris

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM AND COMPONENTS:

Marine Electrical Equipment and Supplies

  • Check battery water level – the single most often ignored task
  • Check/recharge batteries
  • Check terminals for corrosion, clean and lubricate
  • Check bonding system
  • Inspect all wiring for wear and chafe
  • Test all gauges for operability
  • Check shore power and charger
  • Check for spare fuses or breakers
  • Check all lighting fixtures (including navigation lights) and make sure you have spare bulbs
  • Check all electronics for proper operation
  • Inspect antennas

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED EQUIPMENT:

Safety & Flotation

  • Sound signaling device – spare air can for air horn
  • Check distress signals and expiration date
  • Check PFDs (lifejackets)
  • Inspect life rings and cushions
  • Check fire extinguishers certification and recharge if necessary
  • Check and adjust compass
  • Check navigation lights
  • Check charts and replace as necessary
  • Check radar reflector
  • Check and replace first aid supplies
  • Check bailer and hand pump

INBOARD ENGINE(S):

Browse Inboard Engine Parts

  • Change oil & filters – have spare oil & filters onboard
  • Check and change fuel filters – have spares onboard
  • Check and change engine zincs
  • Check cooling system change coolant as necessary – have extra onboard
  • Record engine maintenance log, especially date & hours of last oil changes
  • Check belts for tension – carry spare(s)
  • Check transmission fluid
  • Check and clean backfire flame arrestor
  • Check impeller
  • Check and clean water strainer
  • Check bilge blower
  • Adjust valves, general service engine

OUTBOARD MOTOR:

Browse Outboard Engine Parts

  • Replace spark plugs
  • Check plug wires for wear
  • Check prop for nicks and bends
  • Change/fill gear lube
  • Inspect fuel lines, primer bulb and tank for leaks
  • Lubricate and spray moveable parts

HEAD SYSTEM:

Toilets & Sanitary Systems

  • Checked for smooth operation – lubricate and clean as necessary
  • If equipped with treatment system, have chemicals on hand
  • Y-valve operation checked, valve labeled & secured

WATER SYSTEM:

Freshwater Systems

  • Flush water tank
  • Shock the drinking water tank. Spa shock breaks down in a few days and then can be flushed out
  • Check water system and pump for leaks and proper operation
  • Check hot water tank working on both AC and engines
  • Check for tank cap keys on board
  • Check and clean shower sump pump screens

GALLEY:

Galley

  • Fill propane tank, check electric & manual valves, check storage box vent to make sure it is clear
  • Check refrigerator, clean and freshen, operate on AC and DC
  • Clean stove, check that all burners and oven are working
  • Check microwave, if fitted

TRAILER:

Trailering Parts & Accessories

  • Check for current registration
  • Check rollers and pads
  • Check and lubricate wheel bearings
  • Clean and lubricate winch
  • Lubricate tongue jack and wheel
  • Test lights and electrical connections
  • Check tire pressure and condition
  • Check brakes (if equipped)
  • Check safety chains
  • Check tongue lock

SAILS:

Sailing

  • Check general condition
  • Look for wear and chafing
  • Check battens and batten pockets
  • Check all sail attachments, including grommets, rings, and all reef-points
  • Inspect all of the stitching on the sail edges and all seams. Pay close attention to the leech of the headsail
  • Inspect bolt rope

MAST AND RIGGING:

Rigging Hardware

  • Check mast and spreaders for corrosion or damage
  • Inspect spreader boots and shrouds
  • Inspect rivets and screw connections for corrosion
  • Check reefing points and reefing gear
  • Clean and lube sail track
  • Check rigging, turnbuckles and clevis pins for wear and corrosion
  • Inspect stays for fraying and “fish hooks”
  • Check forestay and backstay connections
  • Check masthead fitting and pulleys
  • Check and lubricate roller furling
  • Check halyards and consider replacing or swapping end for end
  • Tape turnbuckles, cotter pins, and spreaders