Home

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary

 

Hello Boaters, 

It is Fall and for many of us we really appreciate the off-season boating. This season typically means that boaters encounter fewer boats and that the water and weather is subject to frequent changing conditions. Kirk Scarborough of the Coast Guard Auxiliary reminds boaters, “don’t be a boating casualty on the water. Follow these simple rules to have a safe and enjoyable day.” 

  • Check the weather before heading out on the water
  • Monitor the weather continuously with a Marine Radio
  • It is recommended that every one wear an approved PFD, but at a minimum, PFD’s should be readily available.
  • Know about the boat you are on; especially true for those renting or borrowing a boat.
  • More than one person (the skipper) should know the location of all Safety Gear, including the VHF Radio.
  • Do not rely on cell phones as a primary means of communication. Contacting someone on a cell phone precludes aid from a local Good Samaritan.
  • The best way to get help is through a Marine Radio.
  • File a Float Plan with someone who knows where you are going and when you are expected to return. USCG Auxiliary Float Plan in a printable PDF form that you can save to your computer.
  • Receive a free Vessel Safety Check from the USCG Auxiliary.
  • Take a safe boating class in the state you are in.

Marine Communication - VHF & SSB Radios & Satellite Phones

 

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is a uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America’s Volunteer Guardians, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.

Rescue Swimmer Lowered to 3 on Capsized Catamaran

Catamaran Capsized – 3 saved by EPIRB & USCG

The USCG Group Humbolt Bay rescued 3 from the 32-foot catamaran, Cataylist on Saturday July 3rd, 2010. The vessel was transiting from Crescent City to Alameda, California, when it encountered rough sea conditions as reported in D11.USCGNews.com.

The crew activated the EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) in stormy seas, just minutes before a set of massive waves capsized the vessel, with 50 knot winds and 20 foot + waves knocked the boat completely upside down, pinning all three underneath.

Once the EPIRB was activated, the USCG used the registration information from the beacon to contact the family of the vessel’s crew. The crew had left a float plan with the family. The float plan information included a description of the boat, number of passengers aboard, a description of the safety equipment aboard, destination and estimated time of arrival.

“The float plan allowed us to confirm information about the vessel, create a better plan and expedite our search,” said Lt. George Suchanek, an MH-65C Dolphin helicopter pilot that responded to the call.

After escaping the overturned vessel, the three crew members were clinging to the hull while in the frigid Pacific waters 20 miles off Fort Bragg on the Northern California coast. The US Coast Guard helicopter was able to home in on the signal given by the EPIRB and retrieve the crew with the help of a rescue swimmer, hoisting them aboard the helicopter. All three sailors were showing signs of hypothermia.

EPIRBs & Personal Locators

“That EPIRB saved their lives,” stated USCG Lt. George Suchanek.

PLB’s (Personal Locator Beacons) and EPIRB’s (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) offer a measure of safety when all else has gone wrong. The ability to be found alive and fast can make the difference between life or death when in the cold waters of an unforgiving storm.

An EPIRB‘s signal can be turned on in an emergency to transmit the GPS position and identity of the vessel along with other information to a network of satellites orbiting the earth. The USCG monitors all EPIRB activations.

For the full length Video’s from the USCG, see below.

Video-Coast Guard Group Humboldt Bay units rescue three from overturned sailboat

Video-Coast Guard Group Humboldt Bay units rescue three from overturned sailboat part 2